Typography is two-dimensional architecture, based on experience and imagination, and guided by rules and readability.   Herman Zapf
       
     
   Typographic Composition      The way we use type, from a single letter to a crowd, can be incredibly effective. The interplay between letters — in relation to each other, and how you position them on the page or screen — contributes meaning to the use of words. In this workshop students made ‘life drawings’ of projected letterforms, and I explained design decisions particular to each one, to help students understand why certain shapes occur. Students then drew their own letterforms, and these were arranged, as students took turns directing the arrangement from above, as they would on a page, in order to explore meaning typographically, considering how space can be used to communicate. Part 1: life drawing, part 2: typography & architecture, part 3: designing a letter and part 4: composition in space.  Tutors: Catherine Anyango and Dr Helga Schmid, Photo Credits: Dominic Tschudin   School of Communication , Royal College of Art, 2014 
       
     
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  Typography is two-dimensional architecture, based on experience and imagination, and guided by rules and readability.   Herman Zapf
       
     

Typography is two-dimensional architecture, based on experience and imagination, and guided by rules and readability.

Herman Zapf

   Typographic Composition      The way we use type, from a single letter to a crowd, can be incredibly effective. The interplay between letters — in relation to each other, and how you position them on the page or screen — contributes meaning to the use of words. In this workshop students made ‘life drawings’ of projected letterforms, and I explained design decisions particular to each one, to help students understand why certain shapes occur. Students then drew their own letterforms, and these were arranged, as students took turns directing the arrangement from above, as they would on a page, in order to explore meaning typographically, considering how space can be used to communicate. Part 1: life drawing, part 2: typography & architecture, part 3: designing a letter and part 4: composition in space.  Tutors: Catherine Anyango and Dr Helga Schmid, Photo Credits: Dominic Tschudin   School of Communication , Royal College of Art, 2014 
       
     

Typographic Composition    The way we use type, from a single letter to a crowd, can be incredibly effective. The interplay between letters — in relation to each other, and how you position them on the page or screen — contributes meaning to the use of words. In this workshop students made ‘life drawings’ of projected letterforms, and I explained design decisions particular to each one, to help students understand why certain shapes occur. Students then drew their own letterforms, and these were arranged, as students took turns directing the arrangement from above, as they would on a page, in order to explore meaning typographically, considering how space can be used to communicate. Part 1: life drawing, part 2: typography & architecture, part 3: designing a letter and part 4: composition in space.

Tutors: Catherine Anyango and Dr Helga Schmid, Photo Credits: Dominic Tschudin

School of Communication, Royal College of Art, 2014 

_DSC1930 copy.jpg
       
     
_DSC1916 copy.jpg
       
     
_DSC1898.jpg
       
     
_DSC2012 copy.jpg
       
     
_DSC2007.jpg
       
     
_DSC1869 copy7.jpg