Please visit  tableandchairpenandpapertextandtime.com  to see the video pieces.
       
     
   Table and chair; pen and paper; text and time     What sounds long and complicated describes most simply the heart of it all: handwritten books, meticulously crafted as one-of-a-kind objects. This unconventional way of making texts accessible questions our dependency on technology, shifting the focus from mere content delivery to a very personal, even intimate experience of literature. All it takes in the process is a table and a chair to sit on, a pen and paper, and a piece of text worthwhile to be read—­­and rewritten. In a way, this turns back the hands of time, to an era before Gutenberg and the printing press, where print wasn’t on the verge of dying—­indeed where it hadn’t even been born.   Table and chair; pen and paper; text and time  is an exploration of handwriting in various contexts: books, spaces, performances and workshops. It offers an experience in response to the fast pace of contemporary culture.  Shown at: Whitechapel Gallery, London, UK,  2011, Dia:Chelsea, Dia Art Foundation and Visual Arts Gallery, New York, USA, 2010
       
     
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Little_Prince_image-4.jpg
       
     
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image11.jpg
       
     
image08.jpg
       
     
image09.jpg
       
     
Little_Prince_image-1.jpg
       
     
Little_Prince_image-2.jpg
       
     
  Please visit  tableandchairpenandpapertextandtime.com  to see the video pieces.
       
     

Please visit tableandchairpenandpapertextandtime.com to see the video pieces.

   Table and chair; pen and paper; text and time     What sounds long and complicated describes most simply the heart of it all: handwritten books, meticulously crafted as one-of-a-kind objects. This unconventional way of making texts accessible questions our dependency on technology, shifting the focus from mere content delivery to a very personal, even intimate experience of literature. All it takes in the process is a table and a chair to sit on, a pen and paper, and a piece of text worthwhile to be read—­­and rewritten. In a way, this turns back the hands of time, to an era before Gutenberg and the printing press, where print wasn’t on the verge of dying—­indeed where it hadn’t even been born.   Table and chair; pen and paper; text and time  is an exploration of handwriting in various contexts: books, spaces, performances and workshops. It offers an experience in response to the fast pace of contemporary culture.  Shown at: Whitechapel Gallery, London, UK,  2011, Dia:Chelsea, Dia Art Foundation and Visual Arts Gallery, New York, USA, 2010
       
     

Table and chair; pen and paper; text and time   What sounds long and complicated describes most simply the heart of it all: handwritten books, meticulously crafted as one-of-a-kind objects. This unconventional way of making texts accessible questions our dependency on technology, shifting the focus from mere content delivery to a very personal, even intimate experience of literature. All it takes in the process is a table and a chair to sit on, a pen and paper, and a piece of text worthwhile to be read—­­and rewritten. In a way, this turns back the hands of time, to an era before Gutenberg and the printing press, where print wasn’t on the verge of dying—­indeed where it hadn’t even been born.

Table and chair; pen and paper; text and time is an exploration of handwriting in various contexts: books, spaces, performances and workshops. It offers an experience in response to the fast pace of contemporary culture.

Shown at: Whitechapel Gallery, London, UK,  2011, Dia:Chelsea, Dia Art Foundation and Visual Arts Gallery, New York, USA, 2010

image07.jpg
       
     
Little_Prince_image-4.jpg
       
     
image12.jpg
       
     
image11.jpg
       
     
image08.jpg
       
     
image09.jpg
       
     
Little_Prince_image-1.jpg
       
     
Little_Prince_image-2.jpg